Good Practice Criteria for LEDS, NAMAs and MRV

As a first step previous to the Global Good Practice Analysis, a set of quality criteria for LEDS, NAMA and MRV were drafted by a consortium of institutions and reviewed and revised by the initiative’s steering group. Examples from all over the world were then selected and analysed  in-depth based on the following criteria:
 

1. General good practice criteria for mitigation initiatives
 

1

Aims to achieve significant GHG impact (e.g. targets key emission source/sector)

2

Contributes to sustainable development, e.g. to achieving MDGs or other development objectives

3

Aligns with existing LEDS and/or national environment and climate strategies

4

Includes a diverse set of interventions (including policies and financial mechanisms) developed from a thorough analysis of barriers

5

Has a broad scope (e.g. sector-wide or national) and is scalable

6

High level political ownership (e.g. evidenced through use of own financial resources; political champion)

7

Includes an MRV framework

8

Stimulates private investment and leverage

9

Resulted from a participatory process involving key stakeholders

10

Evidence of inter-ministerial coordination and involvement

11

Is fully institutionalised to ensure sustainability of the actions over time and permanence (e.g. cannot be reversed)

12

Includes a well-defined finance plan including national sources as well as a sustainable financing scheme (concept for phase out of international/public funds)

13

Includes a detailed implementation plan

 

2. Technical quality attributes for LEDS

 

1

Country driven process, linked to existing processes, national strategies and measures (e.g. inclusion of priority sectors and development goals) (e.g. Georgia, India, Kenya, Philippines, South Africa)

2

Commitment and leadership at the highest political level (e.g. Mexico, Philippines, South Africa, Republic of Korea, Viet Nam)

3

Coordination across different key ministries (e.g. finance, energy) (e.g. Thailand, Indonesia, South Africa)

4

Involvement of stakeholders across sectors (including the private sector) aiming to build consensus amongst them (e.g. Lebanon, Peru)

5

Long-term vision combined with clear definition of short and medium-term policy goals and measures (e.g. Georgia, Philippines, South Africa, Republic of Korea)

6

Thorough and transparent analysis of scenarios and reduction potential, costs and co-benefits, taking indirect costs/benefits into consideration (e.g. Kenya, South Africa)

7

Balance of different policy areas including economic incentives, information systems and technology deployment and use (e.g. Republic of Korea, Thailand)

8

Reliable data based on scientific analyses (e.g. GHG inventories, BAU scenarios) (e.g. Kenya, Peru, Philippines, Republic of Korea)

9

Use of professional and technical support, advice and peer-to-peer learning, both in government and private institutions (e.g. Georgia, Indonesia, South Africa)

10

Dynamic document in an on-going updating process (e.g. Georgia, India, Philippines, South Africa)

 

3. Technical quality attributes for NAMAs

 

1

Aims to achieve significant GHG impact (e.g. targets key emission source/sector - e.g. Brazil, Colombia)

2

Contributes to sustainable development, e.g. to achieving MDGs or other development objectives (e.g. Kenya)

3

Fits into existing LEDS and/or national environment and climate strategies (e.g. Indonesia)

4

Includes a diverse set of interventions (including policies and financial mechanisms) developed from a thorough analysis of barriers (e.g. Tunisia)

5

Has a broad scope (e.g. sector-wide or national) and is scalable (e.g. Tunisia, Viet Nam)

6

High level political ownership (e.g. evidenced through use of own financial resources; political champion - e.g. Colombia, Ethiopia)

7

Includes an MRV framework (e.g. Indonesia, Republic of Korea)

8

Stimulates private investment and leverage (e.g. Thailand, Tunisia)

9

Resulted from a participatory process involving key stakeholders (e.g. Thailand)

10

Evidence of inter-ministerial coordination and involvement (e.g. Tunisia)

11

Is fully institutionalised to ensure sustainability of the actions over time and permanence (e.g. cannot be reversed)

12

Includes a well-defined finance plan including national sources as well as a sustainable financing scheme (concept for phase out of international/public funds) (e.g. Thailand)

13

Includes a detailed implementation plan (e.g. China, Ethiopia)

 

4. Technical quality attributes for MRV

 

1

Measuring/Monitoring GHG emissions:

 
  1. Established systems for regular tracking of GHG emissions (e.g. Mexico, Tunisia)
 
  1. Covers all economic sectors (e.g. Costa Rica)
 
  1. Development of emission scenarios (e.g. Costa Rica)
 
  1. Adequate financial and human resources (e.g. Costa Rica)
 
  1. Quality assurance process (e.g. Costa Rica)

2

Measuring/Monitoring measures and policies:

 
  1. Includes methods for quantifying direct, indirect, long-term emission reductions and sustainable development co-benefits/costs (e.g. Mexico)
 
  1. Includes baselines, indicators and results chains
 
  1. Adequate financial and human resources
 
  1. Quality assurance process (e.g. Chile)

3

Measuring/Monitoring support (financial, technical and capacity building)

4

Reporting:

 
  1. Includes regular and substantiated reporting on the progress of GHG emission reduction measures (e.g. Chile, Mexico)
 
  1. Includes GHG inventories (e.g. Tunisia)
 
  1. Meets the requirements of biennial update reports (e.g. Tunisia)

5

Verification:

 
  1. Independent experts verify the correctness and quality of the reported information
 
  1. Meets the standards of international consultation and analysis (Annex IV: http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2011/awglca14/eng/l04.pdf)

See individual case studies meeting the Good Practice Criteria at: www.mitigationpartnership.net/gpa.
See more information on background and methodology of the Good Practice Analysis here.
See a summary of the main success factors identified in the study here.